James Balog, Disko Bay, Greenland, 15 March 2008. A massive chunk of the Ilulissat Glacier floats out to sea (detail). © 2014, James Balog/Extreme Ice Survey. Courtesy of the artist.    More

Maya Lin, Silver Hudson (detail). Courtesy of the artist and Pace Gallery.   More

Aviva Rahmani, Warming Skies Over the Louisiana Bayous Seen From a Train Window (detail). Courtesy of the artist.   More

Eric Serritella, Sassy Birch Teapot (detail). Courtesy of the artist. Photo: Andrew Gillis.    More

We harness the power of art to educate, empower and engage the public on climate change.

Our art exhibitions and programs spark conversation and inspire action.

We empower individuals, communities and businesses to create a climate smart world.

Visit our inaugural online exhibition, Honoring Trees

 

James Balog, Redbud tree in spring bloom, Maggie Valley, NC, April 2001. Photograph. ©2001 James Balog Photography. Courtesy of the artist. Few things are as spectacular as a redbud tree in full spring bloom. Showy pink or reddish-purple blossoms adorn graceful branches. As the seasons progress, heart-shaped leaves emerge – reddish at first, dark green in summer and canary yellow in autumn. Redbuds are integral to American history. Native Americans boiled the bark for medicinal uses and ate the flowers raw or fried. George Washington was also fond of this early spring bloomer, transplanting many to his Mount Vernon gardens.

James Balog, Redbud tree in spring bloom, Maggie Valley, NC, April 2001. Photograph. ©2001 James Balog Photography/Earth Vision Institute. Courtesy of the artist.

Special corona virus message:

Behind every “contact-less” delivery and every package of necessities in the mail is a worker risking health – perhaps even life – to keep us safe from the corona virus. Let’s thank these unsung heroes – and the countless medical professionals, government officials, and essential workers who protect us. 

Here’s one modest way to show gratitude: print and post this message of thanks where delivery workers can see it – and share this idea with friends.

Best wishes to all for health and safety!

Graphic design by Gabrielle Handler Rivera. ©Open Space Institute, Inc./Honoring the Future 2020. Permission is granted to reproduce, print, download, copy, or share this image without alteration for noncommercial use only.

Claire Kelly, Parallax: Busy Forest  (2019). [Parallax: The effect whereby the position or direction of an object appears to differ when viewed from different positions.] Glass: Blown, sculpted, and assembled. Dimensions: 15 ¼ x 16 x 36.” © Claire Kelly Glass. Courtesy of the artist. From our online Honoring Trees exhibition.

Discover

The latest in climate art and action

Hearts of Our People Warms the Heart and Lifts the Spirit

Hearts of Our People Warms the Heart and Lifts the Spirit

Now Online at the Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian American Art Museum   Hearts of Our People: Native Women Artists is the first major thematic show to celebrate the artistic achievements of Native women – not as anonymous representatives of their culture, but...

read more
Curated Online Art Exhibition Honors Trees

Curated Online Art Exhibition Honors Trees

We are pleased to announce our inaugural online art exhibition, Honoring Trees. The exhibition, which features the work of 14 leading contemporary artists, is now open for long-term display. The exhibition invites us to reflect on the splendor of trees, the challenges...

read more
Hearts of Our People Warms the Heart and Lifts the Spirit

Hearts of Our People Warms the Heart and Lifts the Spirit

Now Online at the Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian American Art Museum   Hearts of Our People: Native Women Artists is the first major thematic show to celebrate the artistic achievements of Native women – not as anonymous representatives of their culture, but...

read more
Curated Online Art Exhibition Honors Trees

Curated Online Art Exhibition Honors Trees

We are pleased to announce our inaugural online art exhibition, Honoring Trees. The exhibition, which features the work of 14 leading contemporary artists, is now open for long-term display. The exhibition invites us to reflect on the splendor of trees, the challenges...

read more

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Art has the power to change hearts as well as minds. We harness that power to educate, empower, and engage the public on climate change. Your tax-deductible gift enables us to show why we need climate action and how we can achieve it.

Gary Braasch, Tuvalu (detail). Photograph. (c) 2015 Gary Braasch/World View of Global Warming. Courtesy of the artist.

Climate SmARTS for May 2020:

Deepen your understanding of the impacts of climate change and your vision of how we can build a more sustainable society. Delve into the bounty of recent climate change literature. Click here for suggestions on where to start.

Be sure to share this link with family and friends! And check here monthly for additional ideas on “things you can do” to help. Thank you for being part of this effort!